Events

Creating connections in social entrepreneurship.

Current Events

SVI Alberta Builds on Province’s Emergence as a Social Entrepreneurship Hub

SVI Alberta Builds on Province’s Emergence as a Social Entrepreneurship Hub

Trico Charitable Foundation is excited to announce the partnership and sponsorship with SVI Alberta, working alongside Momentum (Thrive), Social Enterprise Fund (SEF), and in cooperation with the Social Venture Institute Hollyhock (SVI). Trico is committed to the development of the social entrepreneurship ecosystem and believe this event will advance that ecosystem.

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Results of the 2nd Canadian Edition of Map the System 2018

Results of the 2nd Canadian Edition of Map the System 2018

NOTE: This article was originally published on the RECODE website and has been cross-posted with permission.

On May 4th, 2018, RECODE and the Trico Charitable Foundation co-hosted the second Canadian edition of Map the System in partnership with the Skoll Centre from the University of Oxford. Map the System is an ‘alternative’ challenge where post-secondary students are tasked with taking a systems approach to social change by demonstrating their understanding of a social or environmental issue.

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A Renaissance in Social Problem Solving: The Introspection and Inspiration of Al Etmanski

A Renaissance in Social Problem Solving: The Introspection and Inspiration of Al Etmanski

The social entrepreneur/changemaker sums up his journey as “fumbling towards ecstasy”. He thinks collectively we could be on the cusp of a renaissance in social problem solving, but the 1st step is how we each work on ourselves. With the benefit of his inspiration & insights, we should see less fumbling & more ecstasy.

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Social Enterprise World Forum 2013

Cross Cultural Collaboration: Managing Beyond Borders

Cross Cultural Collaboration: Managing Beyond Borders

A great idea takes great implementation and working across borders (any border) is not always easy.  Theory only gets you so far when managing beyond borders, this session enabled attendees to learn from practitioners who do it everyday. This session was moderated by Kristin Hayden, Founder/Executive Director, OneWorldNow! ), and featured: Francesca Agnello, Coordinator, ACRACCS Eve Blossom, Founder, Lulan Artisans Andrea Coleman, Co-founder and CEO, Riders for Health Transcript of session: Kristin Hayden: We’re here to talk about cross cultural collaboration and although we all work internationally, which I think is the very traditional way to think about cross cultural collaboration, we would like to go a little deeper today to talk about how that shows up in all areas of our work, even when we don’t go anywhere. There are lots of cultures and worlds to step in and out of every single day and to be mindful of that and how taking on this work in a cross cultural collaborative way is actually the bigger game. And I think the question that we have asked ourselves too is why is it worth it to do this work which is sometimes actually, very uncomfortable. I thought that yesterday. If you heard the plenary with Al Etmanski, who talked about the spiritual canoe and how there’s room for everybody in that canoe. I love that metaphor. I think that also summarizes much of our approach in cross cultural collaboration. Be he also touched on that it’s really hard and sometimes we don’t want to do it. I appreciated that he named that, that sometimes we would just say ‘it’s... read more
Social Innovation Labs

Social Innovation Labs

Labs are an emerging way tackling complex challenges. This panel addressed how they are using this approach in their country and how social enterprises can emerge from this work to enable sustainability. This session was moderated by Tim Draimin, Executive Director, Social Innovation Generation (SiG), and featured: Runa Sabroe, Chief Consultant, MindLab Sarah Schulman, Visiting Scholar, Kennisland Joeri van den Steenhoven, Director, MaRS Solutions Lab While only Joeri’s presentation was recorded, the Q&A of the entire panel is available. Transcript of Joeri van den Steenhoven’s Remarks (includes Q&A): Joeri van den Steenhoven: I think that Sarah Schulman is completely right. We’re part of a big experiment, she called it now the Lab 3.0. I think we’re still finding it out as we go forward what a lab really is and what it actually can provide in terms of value and social good. I would encourage us to learn from each other and have a discussion also later on in this session, but also in the months ahead, about what it actually is this lab. Let me tell you a bit about what we’re trying to do at the MaRS Solutions Lab. I started five months ago, so we’re still very young. I’ve worked, as Tim said earlier, in the Netherlands where I ran a change lab, and I’m basically try to, I love the point that Sarah also raised and, and the experiences that Runa has, with my lab to integrate them into this new initiative called the MaRS Solutions Lab. First of all, why are we doing this? This is a bit of how I look to the... read more
Corporate Social Innovation

Corporate Social Innovation

Corporations are moving from writing cheques to supporting social purpose work to doing it themselves. SEWF 2013 heard from a panel of experts working in this area, identifying trends and discussing the implications for the social enterprise and not-for-profit sectors. This session was moderated by Steven Fish, ED, Canadian Business for Social Responsibility, and featured: Celia Cruz, Executive Director, Instituto de Cidadania Empresarial (ICE). Andrew Hewitt, Founder, The GameChangers Charmian Love, Chief Executive, Volans Andreas Souvaliotis, Co-founder, Social Change Rewards Transcript of session (includes Q&A): Steven Fish: We’ve got a bit of a standing room only situation, which is great. I was concerned of the term Corporate Social Innovation might be seen as an oxymoron for some people and they might, might bail for other sessions so I’m pleased to see the turnout. Thank you so much for turning out in droves. We’re going to spend a few minutes just sort of framing the discussion and talking a little bit about how we’ve come to the concept of corporate social innovation. CBSR was founded back in ’95, mostly social and environmental entrepreneurs coming out of the Greater Vancouver area. Early members like VanCity Credit Union, Mountain Equipment Co-op, Happy Planet Juices and the like were early members and early social and environmental pioneers. So it’s not a space that’s foreign to us, but the predominant theme for our organization focused a lot more on corporate social responsibility and we’re going to talk a little bit about that today and about the evolution and the maturity of corporate social responsibility and how in my view, which we don’t always agree... read more

Enterprising Spirit Conference 2011

Christi Millar on the Knowledge and Inspiration of Social Entrepreneurship

In the following guest blog post, Christi Millar of Canadian Youth Business Foundation explains why she is attending the Enterprising Spirit Conference on November 17. I was in a meeting the other day and the term “social entrepreneurship” came up in discussion.  Mildly embarrassed, a colleague and friend confessed to me, “I’m still not really sure what it all means.”  My response was, “Don’t worry, you are not the first person to say that and I’m not sure that I do either!” To different people, it means different things. I went on to share my definition of social entrepreneurship – and the types of individuals that I work with through my role with the Canadian Youth Business Foundation.  They are the entrepreneurs with a social mission.  The people like CYBF entrepreneur, Robb Price with DeliverGood who identified a social need in the community and created a business to address that need.  DeliverGood matches charities and non-profits that need “stuff” with people and corporations that have “stuff.” But, that’s just a very top level explanation – and one that does not even take into consideration the increasing amount of non-profits that are creating social enterprises that address a social need plus allow the non-profit to become more self-sustaining and less reliant on outside funders. There is so much to learn – and that is why, on November 17th, I will be attending the Enterprising Spirit Conference.  The Trico Charitable Foundation has done a tremendous job of putting together a program that will bring clarity to newbies that are just starting to explore the concept and provide best practices to more established social... read more

Three More Featured Speakers with Three Weeks Left to Go

Planning, practicing and fine tuning social enterprise are the themes of our upcoming Enterprising Spirit: Creating Value and Social Good conference. Our speakers, session leaders and panel participants are a unique group of thinkers who bring a rich knowledge and professional expertise to the social enterprise movement. The final three Conference participants we would like to tell you more about are Mayor Naheed Nenshi, Tonya Surman, and Bill Young. We are thrilled that Tonya Surman will be providing the keynote address during the lunch portion of the Conference and Mayor Nenshi will be speaking at the Social EnterPrize Awards Reception. During the Enterprising Spirit Conference, both Tonya and Bill will be participating in the “Show Me the Money: Solutions to Challenges of Growing Your Social Enteprise” panel session. Mayor Naheed Nenshi is a passionate Calgarian, an accomplished business professional, and a community leader with a solid track record of getting things done.  He’s run a large non-profit, he’s been a trusted advisor to corporate leaders in Canada and the US, and he literally wrote the book on Canadian cities. Mayor Nenshi spent many years at the international business consulting firm, McKinsey & Co., where he advised large telecommunications, banking, retail and oil and gas companies in corporate strategy.  Mayor Nenshi was Canada’s first tenured professor in the field on non-profit management, at Mount Royal University’s Bissett School of Business.  His real passion, though, is making cities, especially Calgary, work better.  He’s been the Chairman of the EPCOR  CENTRE for the Performing Arts, and has lent his expertise to non-profits across the city, including the Calgary Foundation, the United Way, the Coral Springs Community Association, and... read more

Marina Giacomin on Venturing into the World of Social Enteprise

In the following guest blog post, social enterprise practitioner Marina Giacomin explains why she is attending the Enterprising Spirit Conference on November 17. As an experienced social worker and agency leader for over 20 years I’ve never had any difficulty with the “social” cause, or vision of the Social Enterprise business I lead at Servants Anonymous Calgary. However, where my “social work” brain struggles at times is with the “enterprise business” part!  Like an explorer, I find myself discovering strange, new worlds and learning a new language on a daily basis. Where before, “hospitality” merely meant being welcoming, kind and inviting to the people who came to us for help, now as I lead a Social Enterprise events and catering service, it has also come to mean stock and inventory, profit and loss statements, and social return on investment. As a non profit Executive Director, the tenuous nature of funding and how to sustain our social services is something that keeps me (and my Board) awake at night!  Social Enterprise can be an important key to changing this experience. A successful social enterprise not only provides opportunities for people to develop in their understanding of a community’s issues; but also provides a pathway for the greater sustainability of social programs and services. Two things I’ve learned so far: Get the right people into the right positions – yes, social services folks should be staff in your social enterprise business but should they manage it, or manage it alone? The world is full of “corporate refugees” – business minded and experienced people looking for a way to use their skills and gifts in greater service to the... read more
Conference Archives