SEWF 2013: Key Mindsets

SEWF 2013: Key Mindsets

This session targeted three key mindsets that cut across so many opportunities and challenges facing social enterprises and everyone else dedicated to social impact – themes that enabled our attendees to not only make the most of their daily efforts, but make the most of their interactions at SEWF 2013. The three themes were: Social Innovation, The Surprising Power of Empathy, and Living Rhythms: What Social Enterprise Can Learn From Aboriginal Culture. The session was moderated by Dr. Lucy Miller, United Way of Calgary and Area; and featured Mary Gordon, Roots of Empathy; Ilse Treurnicht, MaRS Discovery District; and Dr. Wanda Wuttunee, Professor, director of the Aboriginal Business Education Partners, Asper School of Business. A special thanks to session sponsor Suncor Energy. Below you will find videos of the introduction from Lucy, each speakers’ comments, and greetings from Suncor Energy. More About SEWF   The Trico Charitable Foundation was honoured to host SEWF 2013. It made history in a number of ways – it was a first for Canada and attracted a record number of speakers and attendees (1,000 individuals from more than 30 countries and over 100 speakers from 20 countries) – but we are most proud of the quality of the discussions on Skills Building, Social Finance, Indigenous Social Enterprise, Collaboration, Policy and Research, and Social Innovation.   A special  thanks to Photos With Finesse by Suzan McEvoy for the pictures, BizBOXTV for producing the videos, and Employment and Social Development Canada for helping to make this post-event coverage possible.   We would also like to thank the following partners for making SEWF 2013 possible:   Organizing Partners: Social Enterprise Council of Canada... read more
A Matter of Impact: Key Skillsets (Main Stage Opening Plenary)

A Matter of Impact: Key Skillsets (Main Stage Opening Plenary)

We hoped ‘impact’ would be a crucial component of the conversations throughout all of SEWF 2013, but we wanted to put that primacy of purpose front and centre. As a result, we took a page out of Stephen Covey’s iconic book and began SEWF 2013 with a deliberate focus on the end point of everything we do, ‘impact’. The opening plenary looked at impact from three angles – creating it, measuring it, and collaborating to take it to the next level. The session was moderated by Gerry Higgins, CEO, Community Enterprise in Scotland (CEiS); and featured Al Etmanski, Co-founder, Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network; Craig Kielburger, Co-Founder, Free The Children and Me to We; and Anne Jamieson, Manager, Toronto Enterprise Fund. A special thanks to session sponsor Vancity. Below you will find videos of the introduction from Gerry, each speaker except Craig’s (policies of Free The Children prevent the publication of his video), and greetings from Vancity and the Vancity Community Foundation.     More About SEWF   The Trico Charitable Foundation was honoured to host SEWF 2013. It made history in a number of ways – it was a first for Canada and attracted a record number of speakers and attendees (1,000 individuals from more than 30 countries and over 100 speakers from 20 countries) – but we are most proud of the quality of the discussions on Skills Building, Social Finance, Indigenous Social Enterprise, Collaboration, Policy and Research, and Social Innovation.   A special  thanks to Photos With Finesse by Suzan McEvoy for the pictures, BizBOXTV for producing the videos, and Employment and Social Development Canada in helping to make this... read more
SEWF 2013 Opening Greetings

SEWF 2013 Opening Greetings

Two of the many goals of the annual Social Enterprise World Forum are to build international linkage and galvanize the government of the host. By those measures, SEWF 2013 got off to a rousing start with greetings from Wayne Chiu, Chairman, The Trico Foundation (host of SEWF 2013); Peter Holbrook, Chair, Social Enterprise World Forum and CEO of Social Enterprise UK; and both the provincial and federal levels of government with The Honourable Heather Klimchuk, Alberta’s Minister of Culture, and Candice Bergen, Canada’s Minister of State (Social Development). You can access video of the greetings below. More About SEWF   The Trico Charitable Foundation was honoured to host SEWF 2013. It made history in a number of ways – it was a first for Canada and attracted a record number of speakers and attendees (1,000 individuals from more than 30 countries and over 100 speakers from 20 countries) – but we are most proud of the quality of the discussions on Skills Building, Social Finance, Indigenous Social Enterprise, Collaboration, Policy and Research, and Social Innovation.   A special  thanks to Photos With Finesse by Suzan McEvoy  for the pictures,  BizBOXTV for producing the videos, and Employment and Social Development Canada in helping to make this post-event coverage possible. We would also like to thank the following partners for making SEWF 2013 possible:   Organizing Partners: Social Enterprise Council of Canada MaRS Centre for Impact Investing Social Innovation Generation (SiG) The Canadian Community Economic Development Network Lead Sponsors: Suncor Vancity Government of Canada Canadian Youth Business Foundation (now Futurepreneur) Social Change Rewards Presenting Partners: Enp (Enterprising Non-Profits) Canada Supporting Partners: Capital One KPMG Friends of... read more
Doing it right and keeping Calgary squeaky green

Doing it right and keeping Calgary squeaky green

By Jasmine Retzer, Student, Mount Royal University • The Calgary social enterprises profiled in this article will be the subject of SEWF tours on October 2, 2013. In total, 15 local organizations were toured. A special thanks to Thrive, who helped set up the tours. • This article is part of an ongoing collaboration between the Trico Charitable Foundation and Mount Royal University.[/author_info] [/author]   It comes as no surprise that many of our daily actions impact the environment, from the products we use, to the food we eat, and the businesses we support. A conscious and active effort towards living our lives sustainably along with spending our dollars wisely is needed in order to better our planet’s future. With their green thinking caps firmly on, REAP and DIRTT are two Calgary businesses who are catapulting the city into a more sustainable and eco-innovative world. REAP (Respect for Earth and All People) is a non-profit social network that connects locally owned and sustainably-operated businesses, who each share a deep concern for the greater well-being of the city, environment and planet. With over 100 members within the association, Reap helps to advance sustainable efforts amongst Calgary’s businesses, while raising awareness on the positive impact of supporting local and living an eco-conscious lifestyle. DIRTT (Doing It Right This Time) Environmental Solutions customizes and builds functional and adaptable interior spaces suited to clients’ strategic and social needs.  Approaching sustainability from an environmental and long-term investment point of view, DIRTT builds eco-friendly, innovative and productive spaces within existing buildings as an alternative to conventional and toxic drywall construction. DIRTT Seven years ago, DIRTT... read more
Social enterprise: From problem solving to creating new possibilities

Social enterprise: From problem solving to creating new possibilities

By Michelle Strutzenberger, Axiom News In one of the Social Enterprise World Forum’s closing sessions, author and entrepreneur Ron Schultz made a number of rallying calls to the delegates gathered, including asking those who’ve launched and run social enterprises, “How many of you are willing to put yourselves out of business?” The implication was that social enterprise is in the business of solving problems and ideally there comes a day when that problem has been solved – eradicating the need for the enterprise. But might there be opportunity to expand the definition of the social enterprise role from that of simply solving problems to creating new possibilities? If so, how might the guiding questions one asks in shaping an enterprise be different? What could be the ramifications of doing so – for the enterprise itself, its supporting ecosystem and society in general? Even, how might the energy around the enterprise be different? The argument could be made that this just comes down to subtly different paradigms framing the same issue, and that it’s an unnecessary complication of simple matters. However, if we agree with organizational thought leader David Cooperrider that “words create worlds,” then one’s choice of paradigm could indeed be critical. What kind of world do you want to live in and help create? Consider the difference in questions a possibility-oriented approach to social enterprise could include: What new possibilities might this social enterprise create for our neighbourhood, our region, the world? What energizes me most about this? How does it link to what else is emerging in the world? What’s possible now that wasn’t possible before? What... read more
The Greater Social Enterprise Promise Highlighted at World Forum

The Greater Social Enterprise Promise Highlighted at World Forum

By Michelle Strutzenberger, Axiom News Author Ron Schultz’s favourite social enterprise story has that engaging blend of the bold, bizarre and exciting possibility – an African start-up that is training rats to detect landmines and saving thousands of lives. But the greater social enterprise promise is not so much in the creation of these brave, fresh ventures as it is something that’s often more painful, a number of presenters at the recent Social Enterprise World Forum (SEWF) in Calgary said. Co-operation is the greater social enterprise promise, Canadian entrepreneur and author Al Etmanski says. He has identified three types of entrepreneurs who must work together to generate widespread social change – the disruptor who dreams up and begins to create the new; the bridger, who translates the new to the rest of the world; and the receptor, who eagerly embraces the change and then spreads it around. Al is candid about the pain of collaboration, especially with strangers and those with whom we disagree. But, “imagine if we focus on the goodness of our adversaries, imagine if we stop blaming the other and took responsibility for our own behaviour, our addictive nature, our consumerism, our carbon expenditure, and approached each other with the splendour of our gifts and yes, our imperfections,” Al said during a SEWF plenary. The implication is in that wide generosity and humility of spirit the difficulty of co-operation will be overcome to yield the kinds of gifts that cannot be birthed any other way. Two separate labs during the Oct. 2-4 forum provided delegates an opportunity to “practice” this collaboration. They could hear the challenges... read more
Global Forum a Hotbed of Social Enterprise Curiosity

Global Forum a Hotbed of Social Enterprise Curiosity

By Michelle Strutzenberger, Axiom News The Social Enterprise World Forum delegates convening in Calgary this week bring a rich blend of social enterprise questions and issues they’re keen to explore with peers in the field. Meghan Dear‘s question centres on modelling social mission. “It’s one thing to talk about mandate and social purpose, but it’s another to get into the nitty gritty of how you model it,” says the Alberta founder of a two-year-old social-mission business, Localize. The growth and scale of social enterprise is a pressing topic for Heather O’Hara these days — figuring out the sweet spot in terms of self-sufficiency and at what point a social enterprise is too big or growing for growth’s sake. “It’s not that I’m looking for what’s right or wrong but more of a different perspective on growth and scale generally,” says the director for a B.C. Social enterprise, Potluck Cafe and Catering. This story originally appeared on ENP Canada’s website.   ENP Canada has partnered with Axiom News to explore the Canadian social enterprise movement one story at a time. Each story will provide snapshots and profiles of local social enterprises and the emerging, supportive environment. This story is one of hundreds we will be publishing. Check in every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for the latest news.   Axiom News is also a SEWF 2013 media partner.   More About SEWF   The Trico Charitable Foundation was honoured to host SEWF 2013. It made history in a number of ways – it was a first for Canada and attracted a record number of speakers and attendees (1,000 individuals from more than... read more
From Silos to SEWF: A Journey of Engagement

From Silos to SEWF: A Journey of Engagement

By Elisa Birnbaum, editor-in-chief, SEE Change Magazine Moving Beyond the Silos It’s no secret that many folks in this space we call “social entrepreneurship” spend a lot of their time working in silos. Sometimes it’s by choice, with practitioners believing the only way to get work done is with blinders on, nose affixed to the proverbial grindstone, intimately focused on their next bold step forward. For others, it’s just the reality of getting so bogged down in the day-to-day that they seldom notice the world around them. No matter the reason, silos are as commonplace as pumpkin-flavoured everything in October, whether or not you enjoy the big orange fruit. I, for one, do not but that doesn’t prevent baristas from trying to convince me to ingest their god-awful squash lattes at every turn. But I digress. That’s what made SEWF so refreshing. A synergistic confluence of discourse, knowledge-sharing and networking, the event successfully pulled socially charged zombies from the woodwork and into common ground with positively impressive results. You may have seen these folks, they’re kind’ve hard to miss. They walk slowly at first, uncertain, sniffing about their new environment, eyes and ears set at high alert, trepidatiously taking in the sights and sounds. Eventually, like any mammal who finds safety and potential in novel surroundings, the siloed start to warm up. Like at a Star Trek convention – with its shared language, values and heated opinions but without the turtlenecks and autograph sessions – they began to delight in like-mindedness. Soon, with caution thrown to the wind, these folks proceed to engage, banter, commiserate, collude, imbibe, no longer relegated... read more
It’s a Win! Social EnterPrizing at SEWF

It’s a Win! Social EnterPrizing at SEWF

By Elisa Birnbaum, editor-in-chief, SEE Change Magazine At this year’s Social Enterprise World Forum, four impressive organizations were recognized with Trico Charitable Foundation’s Social EnterPrize awards, celebrating their leadership and excellence in social entrepreneurship. Each of the winners—chosen from over 40 applicants—pursue a unique approach to solving society’s challenges and offer inspired examples of successful models to follow. Take Jump Math, the Gold winner in the over-$1million category.  With a mission of encouraging an understanding and love of math in students and educators, the social enterprise provides math resources for teachers, tutors and students and distributes programs to schools and tutoring organizations with a special concern for those that serve low-income and at-risk students. Thanks to increased demand and healthy sales of program materials and training as well as grants and donations, JUMP Math is ever-growing. In fact, the number of students using its program has increased at a compound annual growth rate of over 40% over the past three years. The Value of Recognition That their innovative programs resulted in this coveted prize—one of many accolades for this organization—had special resonance beyond its financial recompense. “The award itself is the most critical part from our perspective,” says director of development Ewart Newton, explaining how external validation and increased awareness for their work are gifts not to be underestimated. The recognition is especially timely as JUMP Math is in the process of expanding their funding horizons, Newton tells me. Historically, the organization was funded from philanthropic sources and some earned income through selling their programs to schools. But they’re currently looking at significant growth over the next five years in Canada... read more
From Social to Symbiotic: three enterprises are breathing new life into community- based relationships

From Social to Symbiotic: three enterprises are breathing new life into community- based relationships

By Jasmine Retzer, Student, Mount Royal University • The Calgary social enterprises profiled in this article will be the subject of SEWF tours on October 2, 2013. In total, 15 local organizations were toured. A special thanks to Thrive, who helped set up the tours. • This article is part of an ongoing collaboration between the Trico Charitable Foundation and Mount Royal University.     As animals of our own ecosystem, we crave or rather thrive off of connection. Not our cellphone or Wi-Fi connection (although they are wonderful tools) but rather our instinctual desire to create deep and meaningful human connection through shared communion. Symbiotic relationships play a major role not only in the wild but also in our own social co-evolution. In order for social innovation to occur, we need to frequently interact and build relationships that support and grow our ideas. Fostering community is the goal of these next three organizations, whose shared value of connectivity is the ultimate inspiration for their social enterprises. cSPACE Projects is a non-profit real estate enterprise and urban development organization that is reimagining a network of affordable, sustainable and collaborative work spaces across Calgary.  Their mission is to foster creativity, fuel innovative thinking and ignite change by connecting and supporting individual artists and small non-profit organizations within the Calgary community. Calgary Counselling Centre provides compassionate, professional and affordable counselling services for Calgarians. As a leader in research and counsellor training in Canada since 1962, the Centre is committed to supporting a multiplicity of needs by offering a “barrier free” sliding scale pay system for their counselling services to individuals and... read more

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