Women in Need Society (WINS): Social EnterPrize Case Study

Women in Need Society (WINS): Social EnterPrize Case Study

We are excited to announce that the The WINS case study is the first of its kind to have three local post-secondary institutions collaborate on a case study! It’s a testament to Calgary’s growth as a social enterprise hub and the cooperative spirit of that hub that a) three local post-secondary institutions wanted to do a case study on social enterprise and b) they were happy to work together.

The WINS case study demonstrates a social enterprise committed to working with women and their families facing a range of challenges – financial, in the process of leaving shelters, outfitting a home, adapting to a new city or country, or single parents caring for their children. WINS’ balance of delivery of a quality product and service along with profits for re-investment in business operations confirm that it is a deserving recipient of the Social EnterPrize.

Social Enterprise as a Coral Reef:  Insights into the Evolution of Social Impact

Social Enterprise as a Coral Reef: Insights into the Evolution of Social Impact

To mix metaphors, seeing successful social enterprises as coral reefs may be the tip of the iceberg in a new understanding of how social enterprises grow and affect social change, and how we can help them do so. These themes will be explored more fully at our EconoUs2017 event Doing Business Differently: An evening of celebration and insight on September 14, 2017.

Groupe Convex: Social EnterPrize Case Study

Groupe Convex: Social EnterPrize Case Study

Recipient of the Social EnterPrize in 2011, Groupe Convex is featured in the latest edition of our case study series, our effort to more effectively tell the stories of amazing Canadian social enterprises.

Written by the Ontario Institute for Students in Education, University of Toronto, the case study demonstrates a social enterprise committed to generating meaningful jobs in an increasingly diverse number of ways. It also highlights the possible challenges of relying too much on a particular government policy and the difficult choices that come when one income stream does better than another.